Varama Cover Cream
Continuing my search for an opaque undereye concealer, I stumbled across Varama Cover Cream camouflage make-up through my favourite YouTube blogger, OxfordJasmine who recently recorded a video review of Varama. I rarely watch YouTube videos because I’m too impatient and it’s just faster to read words. But I find Jasmine very watchable…

Anyway, back onto Varama Cover Cream. This professional range is designed for serious opaque coverage for tattoos, birthmarks, scars, vitiligo and various other “skin conditions” (see all skin conditions here). It also claims to give a natural finish that is waterproof and smudgeproof.

The cover creams come in various base shades and “drop-in” colours that you can mix to create your perfect colour match. When I contacted Varama for shade advice, they sent me a sample kit (I was actually expecting trial-sized samples which I’m surprised they don’t already sell). I was sent the two base colours, VC2 and VC3 and the Yellow “drop-in” colour.

VC3 is medium beige. It’s almost a perfect match for me on its own (perhaps a teeny bit too dark), so I didn’t need to use the darker shade or yellow drop-in. I’ve come across other “tattoo camouflage” products that require multiple layers of creams and setting powder, but Varama is just a simple cream product that can be applied in thin layers to get more coverage. It also spreads across large areas easily.

Below are the swatches of VC3, VC2 and Yellow, squeezed straight out of the tubes (sorry, I forgot to take a photo of them spread out).

Varama Cover Cream swatches
I know dark undereye circles are a minor “condition” compared to the others that Varama Cover Cream is designed for, but hey, it’s a universal product so I’m still going to talk about it in the context of dark circles for this review.

When the kit arrived in the post, I had already applied my Temptu Undereye Concealer (read my review of it here). So I applied it over the top of one eye, and for comparison purposes I left the other eye with Temptu only. I used a combination of my fingers and a concealer brush to apply a few layers… I didn’t think too much of it, it was just like applying any other liquid concealer. It’s creamy, easy to blend (just make sure you’ve got the right colour!) and doesn’t cake even with multiple layers. A little goes a really long way. Just the tiniest dot is needed for my undereyes.

In terms of opacity, Varama Colour Cream definitely feels more “camouflaging” than all of my everyday concealers. But the difference wasn’t that noticeable until I took a photo 6 hours later, still with Varama only on one eye. I was very pleasantly surprised! In the photo below, I am wearing Varama Cover Cream on my left eye, and Temptu Undereye Concealer on my right eye. It has been at least 6 hours since application of either. Wow I didn’t see that in the mirror! But the camera never lies!

Varama Cover Cream as undereye concealer
I was in a bit of a rush to leave the house after taking that photo so I quickly swiped on the Varama Cover Cream on my right eye using just my fingers and probably just one or two layers. I also reapplied over the top of my left eye (without it going crusty!). You can see the effect of the multiple layers in the photo below. My right undereye circle is more concealed than before, but not quite as much as the left eye which has had more layers applied.

Varama Cover Cream as undereye concealer
In terms of lasting power, this camouflage cream really does last all day. I found that it barely creased under my eyes and for the tiny lines that did appear, a light wipe with my finger was sufficient to blend them away.

Onto the ingredients. So you know how I go on and on about not liking mineral oil because it blocks my pores and sits on top of my skin feeling all slimey? Well, I won’t pretend I wasn’t disappointed that Varama Cover Cream has petrolatum as its second ingredient. But actually, the cream is so good at concealing that I’m going to pass over that fact. If I hadn’t looked at the ingredients list, I would never have known that it contained petrolatum because it doesn’t feel at all greasy. And it’s not like I’m going to use it all over my face…

Here are the full ingredients of Varama Cover Cream (they’re the same for all colours I have):

Varama Cover Cream full ingredients
Anyway, that’s my review of Varama Cover Cream as an undereye concealer. It was vain, but hopefully useful to those of you looking for this kind of opaque coverage. I’ve also briefly tried it on larger patches of skin and the coverage is something you just don’t get from cosmetics brand concealers.

You can find out more about Varama and see the other shades at www.varama.co.uk. A single 15ml tube will set you back £17.49 but a little really does go a long way because of how pigmented the formula is.

Disclosure: PR sample

7 comments on “Varama Cover Cream: Used as an opaque undereye concealer

  1. This sounds like its works like Keromask Concealer. Keromask is another concealer designed to deal with skin conditions. It’s also a british brand but it costs on average £10 for a 15ml tube. I carry it in my kit and it is amazing. You might wanna check it out as a cheaper but equally good alternative to Varama.

  2. This sounds like the perfect concealer, it’s hard to find a heavy duty one that doesn’t cake during the day. Do you know if they’re available in any shops? x

  3. @OxfordJasmine: Yes I really like this product – and I wouldn’t have found out about it if it wasn’t for your review!

    @Natalya: Hahaha! It was great to meet you by the way!

    @Deborah Jones: Ooh thanks, I should check Keromask Concealer out.

    @Peonies and lilies: It is a really, really good concealer, especially for under my eyes… I’ve never used anything like it before! I couldn’t see anything on their website about being available in shops unfortunately… but perhaps drop them an email to check.

    @Queenieeee: Nope I haven’t tried that brand!

  4. You should try ellis faas concealer. It does the best job covering under eyc circles only downside is that its quite expensive.

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